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December 16, 2017

TDmonthly Magazine

April 2010 | Vol. IX - No. 4


U.S. Government Unveils New Design for $100 Note

Know Its Features So You Can Know It’s Real

By TDmonthly Staff
April 2010

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 21, 2010) – Officials from the U.S. Department of the Treasury, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the United States Secret Service unveiled Wednesday the new design for the $100 note, to be issued Feb. 10, 2011. Complete with advanced technology to combat counterfeiting, the new design retains the traditional look of U.S. currency.

New security features in the redesigned $100 note include the 3-D Security Ribbon on the front, which includes images of bells and 100s that move and change from one to the other as the note is tilted, and the Bell in the Inkwell, which changes color from copper to green when the note is tilted, an effect that makes it seem to appear and disappear within the copper inkwell.



“The new security features announced today come after more than a decade of research and development to protect our currency from counterfeiting. To ensure a seamless introduction of the new $100 note into the financial system, we will conduct a global public education program to ensure that users of U.S. currency are aware of the new security features,” said Treasurer of the United States Rosie Rios.

Although less than 1/100th of one percent of the value of all U.S. currency in circulation is reported counterfeit, the $100 note is the most widely circulated and most often counterfeited denomination outside the U.S.

“We took the necessary time to develop advanced security features that are easy for the public to use in everyday transactions, but difficult for counterfeiters to replicate," said Michael Lambert, Assistant Director for Cash at the Federal Reserve Board.

The new design for the $100 note retains three effective security features from the previous design: the portrait watermark of Benjamin Franklin, the security thread, and the color-shifting numeral 100.

The new $100 note also displays American symbols of freedom to the right of the portrait on the front, including phrases from the Declaration of Independence and the quill the Founding Fathers used to sign this historic document. The back of the note has a new vignette of Independence Hall featuring the rear, rather than the front, of the building. Both the vignette on the back of the note and the portrait on the front have been enlarged, and the oval that previously appeared around both images has been removed.

“When the new design $100 note is issued on February 10, 2011, the approximately 6.5 billion older design $100s already in circulation will remain legal tender,” said Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board Ben S. Bernanke. “U.S. currency users should know they will not have to trade in their older design $100 notes when the new ones begin circulating.”

For a more detailed description of the redesigned $100 note and its features, visit www.newmoney.gov where you can watch an animated video, click through an interactive note or browse through the multimedia resources for images and B-roll.





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